How to Travel Between Rome to Venice by Train

red rome to venice train in Santa Lucia station

The best way to travel between Rome and Venice is by train. The two Italian cities are connected by a high-speed rail network which makes the trip easy and convenient. Not only can you avoid the stress of dealing with airports, but you will also likely save money and be able to take in the Italian countryside scenery as you go. Plus, arriving at Venice’s Santa Lucia train station is a pretty unforgettable experience that involves a track over the lagoon and an amazing exit right on the Grand Canal.

exit of Santa Maria Lucia train station venice

Ready to catch the train between Venice and Rome? Here’s everything you need to know about what to expect from the rail journey, how to buy your tickets, and the train schedules.

The Journey

Rome and Venice are located just 245 miles apart as the crow flies. However, this is much longer by road (330 miles, or over 530 km). If you take the high-speed train, you can travel between the two Italian cities between 3-4 hours.

Leaving Rome, the journey is on the same track that you use to travel on the train between Florence and Rome. This means that you pass through city suburbs before reaching the countryside. There are also several tunnels during this first part of the train journey. The tunnels speed things up by allowing the trains to travel at over 150 mph (240 kilometers per hour). The downside is that the underground travel cuts down on the views you have of hilltop towns.

After passing through Florence and the Santa Maria Novella station, the countryside opens up and becomes much flatter. You will see enter the tunnels once more near Bologna but then enjoy wide fields as you approach Ferrara and Padua.

The first Venice stop is Venezia Mestre. This station is located on the Italian mainland. Passengers should buy tickets for Venezia Santa Lucia. After departing Mestre, the train passes over the lagoon. These final few minutes of the train journey are the most impressive. This gives passengers a view of the water and the first glimpse of Venice on the horizon. It is a dreamy way approach to the city.

view of Venice across the water from train

Best of all, you’ll be comfortable during your train trip. High-speed trains in Italy are modern, clean, and offer food and beverages for purchase during the trip (though you are also welcome to bring your own onboard). First Class tickets often entitle you to a free drink and snack from a beverage cart that passes through the cabin, as well.

High-speed trains have space for luggage, which you must carry on board and manage on your own. Overhead above your seat is the most secure, but there are spaces for larger bags and strollers when you board your carriage. Keep in mind that you won’t be able to see these during the journey so you should not pack valuables in these.

empty carriage on Rome to Venice train

If you are traveling between Rome and Venice by train, you need to know the name of the train stations in those cities. Trains for Venice depart Rome from Stazione Termini (Rome’s main train station) and Stazione Tiburtina. As a reminder: in Venice, the main station is Venezia Santa Lucia (abbreviated as Venezia S. Lucia). Venezia Mestre will leave you on the wrong side of the lagoon.

If you are flying into Fiumicino Airport, a new service now offers several trains a day that travels from the airport to Venice (and vice versa) without requiring you to change trains in the city of Rome. 

Rome to Venice Train Tickets

Rome to Venice train tickets can be purchased months in advance or secured at the train station a few minutes before departure. However, these tickets tend to get more expensive as you approach your departure date. If you are traveling around Italy by train, I personally recommend buying high-speed train tickets as far in advance as possible.

If you look for Rome-Venice tickets to reserve in advance then you are also more likely to find a sale. It is possible to find high-speed train tickets between Rome and Venice for around €30. In most cases, these tickets cost closer to €55 and can easily be much more if you opt for First Class or if you are traveling during peak season. Early morning departures and trains leaving around dinner time tend to be a bit cheaper based on lower demand.

Train tickets for the trip between Venice and Rome are available from TrenItaliaItalo, or ItaliaRail (which offers both companies together, searches for any sale prices, plus offers insurance options and 24-hour support).

Regional train tickets between Venice and Rome, are not recommended because the trip can take upwards of 8 hours on a slower train. These trains are less comfortable overall and do not come with a reserved seat. After purchasing the tickets, you need to validate them before boarding the train. They can be purchased at ticket stands and ticket machines inside any train station. Regional trains are only operated by TrenItalia and you will need to switch at different stations between the two Italian cities depending on the exact route you choose.

Remember, unless something is seriously wrong, trains leave exactly on time. Be sure you are there with a few minutes to spare.

Want even more information? Here is a complete guide to buying train tickets in Italy to help you along. 

Rome to Venice Train Schedules

Rome to Venice train schedules will vary a little bit depending on the time of year and the day of the week. For example, trains may be slightly less frequent on Sundays or run with an increased schedule during summer. However, the route between Rome and Venice is incredibly popular and so the trains are very frequent. Here is a sample:

screenshot with times for rome to venice trains

High-speed trains (Italo, Frecciarossa, and Frecciargento) leave at least twice an hour during the day. Keep in mind that except in rare cases, even these high-speed trains will make short stops in major stations. It is not advised that you exit the train at these transit points. These lines are the most direct, offering nonstop service to Venice in just over three hours. Italo trains are often cheaper and just as comfortable but stop at major intermediary stations which means that the journey is closer to 4 hours.

You can check the exact train schedules for your day of departure on the TrenItalia and ItaloTreno websites. If you want to see ALL the possible trains in one place, then I recommend using the ItaliaRail website, which will show both companies and allow you to pick and choose between them. Plus, it is all in English.

Enjoy your trip!

St Marks Square from bell tower

Note: This post may include affiliate links for services that I personally use and recommend. Should you choose to purchase tickets or other services through these links, I may earn a small commission. You are under no obligation to do so and can read more about my policies here

 

7 thoughts on “How to Travel Between Rome to Venice by Train

  1. Greg Speck says:

    You are so right here. My wife and I drove from Treviso to Venice and dropped off our rental car and walked across the bridge and we were on the canal. Amazing. We stopped for breakfast and then walked to the station. Since I am a perpetual worrier while traveling, I had purchased my ticket online for a 1 pm departure. I was able to get an earlier departure to Rome for about 10 euros per ticket. The trip was amazing. Clean, spacious, and new trains sped us to Termini Station. A quick walk to the taxi stand and we were at our Airbnb in the Campo de FIori in minutes. Italys trains are a relaxing and easy way to travel.

  2. Annette Paul says:

    We did this in December. I had two inexperienced travelers with us and we found it pretty easy overall. The only thing that surprised me about the train (and clearly the regular riders already knew it because many had external power packs with them) is that there is no where on the train to plug in your phone or tablet to charge up, so be sure you are fully charged before you go.

  3. Sue Mundt says:

    When I visit Rome I always use these wonderful trains to travel to Venice, Milan and Florence. However, one trip, my reserved seat was saturated when I sat down at the beginning of my journey. The staff would not assist me find another seat…I ended up sitting on the floor all the way back to Rome from Florence. Not a comfortable journey for a middle aged woman travelling on her own, with people staring the whole time. But that has not stopped my italian train use 😁

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