A day trip from Rome to Palestrina, Lazio

A day trip from Rome to Palestrina, Lazio

Guidebooks might tell you that the best day trips from Rome are to the north in Umbria and Tuscany. Others might insist you should tour Campania for the day.

However, the real secret is that some of the best day trips are actually quite close to Rome and in the same province of Lazio. One tiny example is Palestrina.

The small town of about 20,000 people is 35 kilometers (21 miles) east of Rome.

While it has some lovely cobblestone lanes, the town is probably best known for its archeological museum set on the site of a massive ancient temple.

Archaeology Museum in Palestrina Italy sitting on an ancient temple foundation
Archaeology Museum in Palestrina

Some of the ruins are still visible and served as the foundation for a Renaissance palace which later became the National Archaeological Museum of Palestrina.

two people sit on the temple in Palestrina Italy overlooks the countryside

Palestrina has been inhabited since the 7th or 8th century BC, so the museum has no shortage of important statues, icons, pottery and more.

roman marble bust inside the archaeology museum in Palestrina

One of the most impressive pieces in the collection is a large mosaic depicting the Nile River. The elaborate animals and figures are incredibly well preserved.

close up detail of the nile scene in the famous mosaic in Palestrina Italy

But aside from the temple and the artifacts (which I can admittedly only manage in moderation), Palestrina has long been praised for its cool breezes.

If you find yourself in Rome in summer – trust me – you soon learn to appreciate the importance of a cool breeze.

rooftops and church tower in the town of Palestrina Italy near Rome

Emperors used to build their summer villas here in order to escape the heat of Rome themselves.

But the town’s most famous son is Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, a Renaissance composer who had a major impact on church music as we still know it today. There is a musical museum dedicated to him in the town center.

a man and a woman walk away from the camera in Palestrina next to old stone walls

The small shady streets might be just the weekend antidote you need when the city become stifling.

The sherbet-colored homes just add to the charm.

young couple walks down a softly lit Italian street

We joined the slow-moving groups of residents as they made their leisurely passeggiatas through town.

The main street in Palestrina Italy with groups of people walking

Palestrina truly is an easy day trip from Rome (with a car), but if you would like to spend more time in the countryside, I highly recommend a night or a meal at La Polledrara.

black and white cat sits in the sun on a low wall above stairs in Palestrina Italy

I discovered Palestrina thanks to Italy Where Else, a young company that organizes experiences and outings in the Rome countryside. They are fabulous and know all of the hidden corners so if you would like a 5% discount, you can use the code “Rome17” when booking.

How to Get to Palestrina

Palestrina is set in the countryside outside of Rome, literally into the side of a steep hill. The easiest way to reach Palestrina is by car, driving along the A1. Exit at San Cesareo and follow the signs to Palestrina.

COTRAL buses leave from the Anagnina (Metro A). It is best to buy a return ticket before leaving the metro station.

Where to Stay in Palestrina

For a quiet retreat that is still close to the center of town, try Villa Finza. The villa is set inside its own private park and the rooms have a rustic design. The owners can even arrange shuttles for guests to explore nearby attractions like Villa D’Este in Tivoli.

For tastefully updated holiday apartments in town, there are the Modern Apartments inside a 19th-century residential building. Each apartment has a kitchen and free Wi-Fi, very close to the town center.

But for the best views and loads of local charm, you should pick the Altavista apartment. There are two bedrooms, exposed wood beams, a balcony, and plenty of contemporary comforts like an iPhone dock.

a view of the town center in Palestrina Italy near Rome

Note: This post includes affiliate links to companies that I personally use and recommend. If you choose to book, I may receive a small commission. 

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Natalie

Natalie is a food and travel writer who has been living in Rome full time since 2010. She is the founder and editor of this blog and prefers all of her days to include coffee, gelato, and wine.

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4 Comments

  1. Jane
    October 13, 2017 / 5:41 pm

    Hi, thanks for your advice. I enjoy reading your blog. It’s useful when I am living in Rome and need inspiration. I wondered if you have had the chance to visit Old Frascati Wine Tour, in the Castelli Romani. I found it on-line at https://www.oldfrascati.com. We got an insider’s glimpse into this ancient Italian village. We were introduced to new friends and local artisans who provide porchetta (their famous delicious pork), traditional house wine in the rustic Fraschetta and the baker at 14th century bakery. Then, we were whisked away to a vineyard and casale to taste delicious local wines and learn about the history of wine making in the region. We tasted their red, white and dessert wines while enjoying the Italian countryside, with views to Rome. If that wasn?t enough, we were then driven back to Frascati for a meal at a family oesteria with lunch of local cold cuts, cheeses and two kinds of homemade pasta, paired with our favorite wine from the wine tasting. It was an awesome foodie day! I wanted to share it with you in case you want to try this hidden gem for yourself.

    • Natalie
      Author
      October 14, 2017 / 8:11 am

      I don’t know it! Thanks for sharing!

      • Nancy Camilli Perone
        January 1, 2018 / 3:47 am

        Thank you for your love of Palestrina. Home of my ancestors!!

        • Natalie
          Author
          January 1, 2018 / 4:30 pm

          What a lovely part of Italy to have as part of your heritage!

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